jams

Jam roly poly recipe

Posted on February 7, 2021 at 2:36 pm

A new word for a lot of Americans will be “stodge”. It’s a word with many negative connotations, but in the case of Jam Roly Poly that’s what it’s supposed to be – a stodgy comfort food designed to deliver calories straight to your waistline. Enjoy!

  • 300g / 10.5oz / 2 cups AP flour or GF flour blend
  • 130g / 4.5oz shredded suet OR butter
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • pinch of salt
  • juice of 1/2 lemon (about 1 tablespoon)
  • 200ml / about 6.75oz water (or more if needed)
  • 2 -3 tablespoons of jam, slightly warmed with a little water
  • custard
  • Preheat the oven to 160c / 315f.

    Blend the first 4 ingredients thoroughly. Add the lemon juice to the water and stir into the flour blend until the dough just comes together – it should be slightly sticky, but not wet. With GF flour blends you may need to add a little more water – if so, add it a tablespoon at a time.

    Roll the dough out to a half inch / one cm thickness. Try to get it as close to a rectangle as you can. If you’re me, a rough potato shape is the best I can do!

    Spread the jam thinly over the surface, leaving an edge about the thickness of the width of your thumb at a long edge. Slowly and gently roll the dough towards the exposed edge, without trying to get it super tight. You want a rough cylinder with a little internal room for expansion. Pinch the cylinder closed at the jamless edge and leave the join up for the moment.

    Butter up some baking paper and roll the dough log onto it, join side down. Wrap the dough log loosely with the baking paper, making sure the log is completely surrounded, and tie off the ends with string. Wrap the log up in a tea towel or foil to create a sealed cylinder.

    Place the wrapped roly poly in a loaf pan or other convenient heat resistant receptacle, then place the receptacle on a trivet or other support (such as old jam jar lids) into a baking pan. Place the baking pan in the oven and pour boiling water into the baking pan – you want plenty of water in there, but not so much it splashes out of the baking pan. You also don’t want any water entering the loaf pan with the pudding in it.

    Bake for 1 hour. Serve cut into slices so that you can see the internal swirl. Cover generously with custard and serve with a nice cuppa tea.

    One note, this is not a super sweet pudding. The dough is meant to be fairly plain to allow the jam and the custard to take central stage.

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    Queen of Puddings

    Posted on May 10, 2020 at 6:02 pm

    For Mother’s Day, I asked my wife to choose a pudding we’d never had before. To be extra mean I handed her a book with over 140 classic British Pudding recipes – how horrible I am!

    She chose Queen of Puddings. I have had this once before in my whole life. It’s one I felt nervous about making, because… well, I’m not sure why. I just was.

    Thankfully the nerves were unnecessary. It’s actually quite easy to make, as pudding should be. And as a bonus, it’s easy to make gluten free!

  • 180g / 6.5oz breadcrumbs OR an equal mix of corn flakes and oats
  • 150g/5oz caster sugar (take granulated sugar and pulse in food processor till fine but not powder)
  • 600ml / 20oz / 2.5 cups milk
  • 60g / 2oz unsalted butter
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla
  • 4 large egg yolks
  • 4 large egg whites
  • 100g / 3.5oz berry jam
  • Optional: zest of 1 lemon
  • Stir the breadcrumbs (or GF option) to mix with the zest and 30g/1oz of the sugar.

    Combine the milk, butter, and vanilla in a pan and heat gently until the butter is just melted. The mix should be slightly more than blood warm. Whisk the egg yolks into the warm milk then stir into the crumbs. Leave the mix to stand and soak for 10 minutes while you heat the oven to 180c/350f. Make sure they soak for at least 10 minutes.

    Pour the mixture into a buttered pie pan and bake for 20 to 30 minutes until it is cooked through and set – although it’s technically a custard, you want it to set fully.

    Warm the jam in a small pan or in the microwave until it’s liquid. Spread the jam over the baked base – it should make a generous coating.

    Whisk the egg whites to stiff peaks and gently fold the sugar in to make the meringue. Pile over the jam, spreading to the edge of the pie dish.

    Bake the meringue for 10 minutes or so until it’s lightly golden brown and slightly crunchy. Let the pudding cool down until it’s room temperature.

    Serve at room temperature or cold. Be prepared for some slight cognitive dissonance – it looks like pie, but it eats like pudding!

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    Low Sugar Jam

    Posted on July 2, 2016 at 6:04 pm

    Here in Alabama, u-pick is really coming into its own. Today we picked nearly 2 gallons of blueberries at an awesome local farm (Bear Mountain) that grows its berries according to organic principles (that means, they haven’t paid the federal government for the privilege of the “certified organic” label!)

    But you only really get the benefit of the full awesome flavour and colour of fresh, seasonal fruit if you avoid cooking them into oblivion, which you will with conventional pectin.

    This is why I always, and only, recommend Pomona’s Universal Pectin (Amazon link). Unlike conventional pectin you can make jam with NO added sugar, or with alternative sweeteners such as honey or maple syrup.

    Once you go Pomona’s you will never go back to adding more sugar than fruit to your preserves!

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    Reduced Sugar Cherry Jam

    Posted on July 28, 2012 at 7:17 pm

    I am loving the results I get with Pomona’s Pectin. The jam tastes like fruit gently stewed in honey. Wonderful.

    4 cups, mashed or chopped, pitted cherries
    1/4 cup lemon or lime juice
    4 tsp calcium water

    Place these ingredients in a large saucepan and start to gently heat.

    1 cup honey (or, if you must, 3/4 to 2 cups sugar)
    3 tsp Pomona’s pectin mixed thoroughly into the honey (or, yuck, sugar)

    Bring the fruit/juice/calcium water to a BOIL. Pour the honey/pectin mix into the saucepan and stir while bringing the mix back to the boil. Pour cherry jam into heated jam jars, lid up, and stick into your boiling water bath canner for 10 minutes. Once the 10 minutes is up, take off the heat, remove lid from the canner, leave for 5 minutes, then place jars onto a cookie sheet to cool over night. Enjoy!

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    Low added sugar blackberry jam

    Posted on May 29, 2012 at 8:04 am

    Having picked a lot of delicious blackberries at Holmestead Farm as part of my fun U-Pick experience, I set out to create some awesome low added sugar blackberry jam, using Pomona’s Universal Pectin.

    Yield: about 5 cups (5 jelly jars)
    Thoroughly rinse and pick through your blackberries

    • 4 cups blackberries
    • 1 cup honey
    • 2 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin
    • 2 teaspoons calcium water
    • 1/4 cup lemon juice

    1. Prepare jars by washing and rinsing. I leave the jars in the hot water bath canner while I bring it up to a boil.

    2. Measure fruit into pan with lemon juice (you can use lime juice instead if you prefer).

    3. Add calcium water into pan and stir well.

    4. Measure room temperature honey into separate bowl. Thoroughly mix proper amount of pectin powder into honey (if you prefer to use sugar, you can use 3/4 to 2 cups of it instead of honey).

    5. Bring fruit to boil. If you prefer a chunky texture just stir the fruit mix – if you want something a bit smoother, you can mash the fruit or even feed it through a food mill to remove seeds. If you want seedless, add an extra cup of fruit to correct for the loss of bulk in the milling process. Add pectin and honey mix and stir vigorously for 1-2 minutes while cooking to dissolve pectin. Return to boil and remove from heat.

    6. Fill jars to 1/4″ of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 min. (add 1 min. more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check sealsโ€“lids should be sucked down. Lasts about a hypothetical 3 weeks once opened, but if you’re anything like me it’s doubtful the jar will last more than 3 days ๐Ÿ˜‰

    The most awesome part about the Pomona’s Pectin is that you can scale the recipes either way – you can double it or halve it without in any way affecting the quality of the finished product. You cannot do this with conventional pectin, hence my preference for Pomona’s.

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    Reduced Sugar Strawberry Jam

    Posted on April 21, 2012 at 7:57 pm

    Pomona’s Pectin is an alternative to conventional pectin, which allows you to make jams with reduced, or no, sugar.

    Due to the very mild winter we have had this year, strawberries have come into season early and very sweet. What else could I do apart from make some jam? And as I have Pomona’s Pectin, and some local honey, well… that’s pretty much a match made in heaven!

    Prepare your boiling water bath canner along with 7 jam jars, lids, and rings.

  • 8 cups of crushed or sliced strawberries
  • 2 tsp calcium water
  • 1.5 cups of honey
  • 2 tsp Pomona’s Pectin
  • Put the strawberries and calcium water into a large cooking pot. Mix the pectin into the honey very thoroughly. Bring the strawberries and calcium water to a full boil, stir in the blended honey and pectin while returning the strawberries to a full boil. Once the jam has returned to a full boil, allow it to stand for a couple of minutes then stir thoroughly – this short rest should make sure that the fruit gets distributed evenly throughout the jam.

    This will make a jam that is semi-solid with a nice juicy texture. For a thicker jam, try a sliding scale of up to double the pectin and the calcium water. If you double the pectin and calcium the jam should set almost solid.

    Put the jam into the jars, boil for 10 minutes, allow to cool for at least 12 hours, label, and store in a cool, dark place. Jam!

    Check this ingredients list against commercially made jams. What do you notice? No preservatives, no High Fructose Corn Syrup, no artificial colouring. Just fruit, pectin, honey, calcium, and a little water. In other words… food.

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    Pluot Jam

    Posted on August 7, 2011 at 12:17 pm

    I am in the lucky position where the farmer’s market comes to our office once a week. This is a great way to get people to eat more fruit and veg (put it right in front of them!) so I bought some pluots* and proceeded to make jam with them!

    4 pints of sorted, scrubbed, and chopped pluots – about 3lbs
    1/4 cup lemon juice – fresh squeezed or bottled
    1/2 cup Water
    5 cups white sugar
    1 packet pectin
    1/2 teaspoon vegetable oil (I use plain olive oil – not the extra virgin stuff)

    Put the chopped pluots in the pot with the water, lemon juice, pectin, and sugar. Heat gently while stirring vigorously to ensure the pectin is completely incorporated into the mix.

    Once the pectin is fully incorporated, apply medium-high heat while stirring frequently until the mixture comes to a full, rolling boil – a boil that cannot be stirred down. Keep boiling and stirring for at least 1 minute then take off the heat. If there is a lot of foam stir in the 1/2 teaspoon of vegetable oil and allow to rest for 5 minutes.

    Once the 5 minutes is up, stir the mixture, jar, lid, ring, and boiling water bath process for 10 minutes, Yield: 8 to 10 jelly jars (1/2 pint).

    * pluot: hybrid between a plum and an apricot

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    Fruity banana chutney

    Posted on June 14, 2010 at 7:38 pm

    Ah, chutney. A loanword from the Hindi chatni, it means “spicy preparations to accompany a main dish”. It is also an awesome accompaniment to grilled foods, roasts, and cheeses. As an added bonus, chutney is a great way for parents to sneak extra fruit and veggies onto the plates of fussy eaters!

    This recipe combines bananas and dates, two of the favourite foods of our own non-fussy eater, producing a wonderfully tangy, sweet and fruity condiment. Preparing chutney combines two skills you probably already have – making jam and making pickles.

    Yield: between 5 and 8 jelly jars (8oz), depending on how thick you like it:
    1.5 cups cider vinegar
    1 cup chopped, cored, peeled apple
    1.5 cups mashed bananas (approximately 3 medium sized bananas)
    1 cup chopped pitted dates
    1 cup chopped putted prunes
    1 cup chopped onion
    0.5 cup chopped dried apricot
    0.5 cup mixed candied peel (I omitted this when I made this recipe as I didn’t have any!)
    3 cloves chopped garlic
    1.5 cups lightly packed dark brown sugar
    0.5 cup water
    1.5 tsp ground coriander
    1 tsp cayenne
    1 tsp ground allspice
    1 tsp ground turmeric
    1 tsp fresh grated ginger

    In a large stainless steel saucepan combine vinegar and apple. Add bananas, dates, prunes, onions, apricots, candied peel (if using) and garlic. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat and boil gently, stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes. Add brown sugar, water, coriander, cayenne, allspice, turmeric, and ginger, stirring to dissolve sugar. Boil gently, stirring frequently, until it reaches your desired consistency – I like a thicker, more spreadable chutney but you may prefer a more liquid one.

    While this is going on, have your jars in the hot water bath canner to sterilise. Clean and prepare the lids and rings.

    Ladle the hot chutney into the hot, sterilised jars, leaving 0.5 inch headroom. Remove bubbles and adjust headroom by adding or removing hot chutney. Wipe rim, centre the lid on the rim, and screw down the ring until finger-tight (just tighten the screw ring until the jar starts spinning, don’t screw them down tight).

    Process in your hot water bath canner for 10 minutes at a boil. After 10 minutes remove the canner from the heat, remove the lid from the canner, and let them sit for 5 minutes. Remove the jars from the canner and place on a cookie rack or a towel and leave for 24 hours to cool. Label, store, and eat ๐Ÿ™‚

    chutney with cheese and crackers

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    Strawberry jam

    Posted on May 16, 2010 at 5:52 pm

    Everyone’s favourite, strawberry jam is very simple and easy to make. The only reason why there are so many ingredients in the commercial versions is to make the jam shelf stable for, apparently, decades. Home made strawberry jam is so delicious you won’t have to worry about shelf life!

    • 8 cups crushed hulled strawberries that have been rinsed off in a 50/50 white vinegar/water solution (unless they are 100% organic)
    • 6 cups sugar
    • 2 tablespoons lemon juice (optional)
    1. Prepare cans and lids.
    2. Combine strawberries, lemon juice (if using) and sugar in a large non-reactive pan. Heat over medium-low heat until the sugar has all melted. Boil, stirring frequently, until the jam passes the sheet test or whatever test you prefer – when you pick up some of the jam on a spoon, it should all come off in one sheet when you tip the spoon into the pan.
    3. Process in a boiling water canner for 10 minutes, remove canner from the heat, remove the lid, and leave the jars for 5 further minutes. Your jam is done!

    See, I told you it’d be easy. As an added bonus, your whole house will smell of strawberries for hours after!

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    Spiced apple jelly

    Posted on January 2, 2010 at 2:45 pm

    Here’s a simple jelly recipe to start you off – lightly spiced apple jelly. Makes about six 8-ounce (250ml) jars.

    4 cups / 1 litre unsweetened apple juice

    1 package regular fruit pectin

    7 cups / 1.75 litres sugar

    3 cloves

    3 allspice berries

    1/4 teaspoon ginger powder

    Prepare jars and lids according to instructions for hot water bath canning. Grind the spices into a fine powder and add to the sugar.

    Add apple juice to a large, non-rective pan. Whisk the pectin into the juice until completely incorporated. Bring to a boil over high heat, stirring frequently.

    Once the juice is boiling add the sugar all at once and return to a full rolling boil, stirring constantly. Boil hard for 1 minute. Remove from the heat and quickly skim off any foam. Add to heated jars, leaving 0.25inch /0.5cm headroom and process in hot water bath canner according to instructions.

    The essence of creative cooking is to be able to customise and tweak recipes to your own taste. This recipe makes a gently perfumed, spiced apple jelly – if you like a stronger flavour, increase the spices or change them around as you wish to make a completely custom flavour.

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