pudding

Jam roly poly recipe

Posted on February 7, 2021 at 2:36 pm

A new word for a lot of Americans will be “stodge”. It’s a word with many negative connotations, but in the case of Jam Roly Poly that’s what it’s supposed to be – a stodgy comfort food designed to deliver calories straight to your waistline. Enjoy!

  • 300g / 10.5oz / 2 cups AP flour or GF flour blend
  • 130g / 4.5oz shredded suet OR butter
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • pinch of salt
  • juice of 1/2 lemon (about 1 tablespoon)
  • 200ml / about 6.75oz water (or more if needed)
  • 2 -3 tablespoons of jam, slightly warmed with a little water
  • custard
  • Preheat the oven to 160c / 315f.

    Blend the first 4 ingredients thoroughly. Add the lemon juice to the water and stir into the flour blend until the dough just comes together – it should be slightly sticky, but not wet. With GF flour blends you may need to add a little more water – if so, add it a tablespoon at a time.

    Roll the dough out to a half inch / one cm thickness. Try to get it as close to a rectangle as you can. If you’re me, a rough potato shape is the best I can do!

    Spread the jam thinly over the surface, leaving an edge about the thickness of the width of your thumb at a long edge. Slowly and gently roll the dough towards the exposed edge, without trying to get it super tight. You want a rough cylinder with a little internal room for expansion. Pinch the cylinder closed at the jamless edge and leave the join up for the moment.

    Butter up some baking paper and roll the dough log onto it, join side down. Wrap the dough log loosely with the baking paper, making sure the log is completely surrounded, and tie off the ends with string. Wrap the log up in a tea towel or foil to create a sealed cylinder.

    Place the wrapped roly poly in a loaf pan or other convenient heat resistant receptacle, then place the receptacle on a trivet or other support (such as old jam jar lids) into a baking pan. Place the baking pan in the oven and pour boiling water into the baking pan – you want plenty of water in there, but not so much it splashes out of the baking pan. You also don’t want any water entering the loaf pan with the pudding in it.

    Bake for 1 hour. Serve cut into slices so that you can see the internal swirl. Cover generously with custard and serve with a nice cuppa tea.

    One note, this is not a super sweet pudding. The dough is meant to be fairly plain to allow the jam and the custard to take central stage.

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    Figgy Pudding Cheesecake

    Posted on December 23, 2020 at 9:56 pm

    So, you want a plum pudding cheesecake. I have you covered. Yes, the title says figgy pudding…. this has both figs and plums in it, so I still have you covered!

    This is a crustless cheesecake. You are welcome to add one if you wish.

  • 3 packs cream cheese (8oz / 225g each)
  • 1 cup white sugar or equivalent (7oz / 200g)
  • 1 cup sour cream (240g)
  • 1 cup heavy cream (230g)
  • 3 tbsp flour of choice
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 tbsp vanilla
  • 2 oz (60g) each dried figs, plums, and 2 other dried fruits of choice, cut into roughly equal sized pieces, for a total weight of 8.5oz / 240g
  • Preheat oven to 350f / 180c. Boil kettle.

    Put sugar in bottom of mixer bowl. Put the 3 packets of cream cheese on top. Mix on medium speed until completely combined. Blend in the sour cream, heavy cream, and then the eggs one at a time, making sure each is completely incorporated before adding the next. Blend in the vanilla and flour.

    Remove bowl from mixer. Fold in the chopped dried fruit. Split between two 9 inch / 23cm pie pans. Place pie pans in deep baking dish and pour boiling water into the baking dish until it comes half way up the pie pan.

    Bake for 60 minutes, or until the centre of the cheesecake is mostly set – you’re looking for a slight wobble.

    Allow to cool to room temperature and then refrigerate. Serve cold with mulled wine, a Wassail cup, or a nice cuppa tea.

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    Baked custard

    Posted on November 11, 2020 at 8:21 am

    Baked custard is another classic British pudding. It’s simple, cheap, and feels way more gluttonous and indulgent than the ingredients would suggest. It’s also inherently gluten free!

  • 600ml / 18 US fl oz heavy whipping cream
  • 3 large eggs
  • 50g / 2oz caster (fine table) sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla essence (or to taste)
  • 1/4tsp ground nutmeg, or to taste
  • optional: dried fruit, chopped to roughly equal size
  • Preheat your oven to 325F / 170C. Boil your kettle, or set a pot of water to boil on your stove top.

    Butter an ovenproof dish, about 1 quart / 1 litre capacity. If adding dried fruit, scatter it evenly around the bottom of the dish.

    Scald the cream and vanilla (heat until the cream is just beginning to lightly steam and small bubbles appear around the edge). Do not boil the cream.

    Whisk the eggs, nutmeg, and sugar together. Pour a thin stream of the hot cream into the eggs and sugar, whisking constantly, until all of the hot cream has been incorporated into the eggs.

    Place a large baking pan into the preheated oven. Put the ovenproof dish into the large baking pan. Pour the custard into the baking dish. Pour boiling water into the baking pan until the hot water comes about half way up the side of the ovenproof dish.

    Bake for 1 hour. Serve hot or cold. Once cold, the custard will be set with a fairly firm consistency, firmer than creme brulee.

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    Gluten free instant chocolate mug cake

    Posted on September 28, 2020 at 11:52 am

    Yes, another mug cake. I’m having fun with it, so why not?

    Add to a large mug

  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 to 4 tablespoons monkfruit/erithrytol blend, or similar, to your taste
  • optional – pinch of salt
  • Microwave on high for 30-45 seconds until the butter is melted. Stir to incorporate and allow to cool slightly. Add

  • 3 tablespoons almond flour
  • 1 egg
  • 1 teaspoon vailla
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons cocoa powder
  • Stir to incorporate. Microwave on high for 90 to 120 seconds. Bingo, gluten free, keto friendly, chocolate cake.

    CUSTOMISE IT
    Instead of butter, use a neutral oil such as avocado, or a characterful oil like coconut.
    Instead of vanilla, use maple flavouring, or any other you want to try.
    Want to amp up the chocolate? Add chocolate chips, or a little instant coffee powder.
    Why not add dried fruit, or other baking chips like butterscotch? Why not add chopped or whole nuts?
    Nut allergy? You can use any flour you like. This should work with buckwheat, millet, or any other flour that suits your needs.
    Vegan? I would love to hear how you can tweak this recipe to suit your tastes. Please feel free to reply to this with your comments!

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    Spotted Dick Mug Cake

    Posted on September 23, 2020 at 6:15 pm

    This is the instant version of my full Spotted Dick recipe. See there for my comments on the name! This version is gluten free, sugar free, and can be easily tweaked to be keto friendly. Enjoy!

    INGREDIENTS

  • 1 tablespoon (or so) of currants, raisins, or as you prefer
  • 1 tbsp of brown liquor or water
  • mix these together and microwave for 30 seconds. From here you proceed like the cinnamon roll recipe.

  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 3 tablespoons almond flour
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 teaspoon mixed spice (pumpkin pie spice)
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon monkfruit/erithrytol blend, or similar
  • optional – pinch of salt
  • Melt the butter on top of the fruit mixture, then add the rest of the ingredients on top. Stir thoroughly to combine and microwave for 90 seconds to 2 minutes. The top of the pudding should be just set and no more.

    Turn out on a plate and serve with a nice cuppa tea.

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    Queen of Puddings

    Posted on May 10, 2020 at 6:02 pm

    For Mother’s Day, I asked my wife to choose a pudding we’d never had before. To be extra mean I handed her a book with over 140 classic British Pudding recipes – how horrible I am!

    She chose Queen of Puddings. I have had this once before in my whole life. It’s one I felt nervous about making, because… well, I’m not sure why. I just was.

    Thankfully the nerves were unnecessary. It’s actually quite easy to make, as pudding should be. And as a bonus, it’s easy to make gluten free!

  • 180g / 6.5oz breadcrumbs OR an equal mix of corn flakes and oats
  • 150g/5oz caster sugar (take granulated sugar and pulse in food processor till fine but not powder)
  • 600ml / 20oz / 2.5 cups milk
  • 60g / 2oz unsalted butter
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla
  • 4 large egg yolks
  • 4 large egg whites
  • 100g / 3.5oz berry jam
  • Optional: zest of 1 lemon
  • Stir the breadcrumbs (or GF option) to mix with the zest and 30g/1oz of the sugar.

    Combine the milk, butter, and vanilla in a pan and heat gently until the butter is just melted. The mix should be slightly more than blood warm. Whisk the egg yolks into the warm milk then stir into the crumbs. Leave the mix to stand and soak for 10 minutes while you heat the oven to 180c/350f. Make sure they soak for at least 10 minutes.

    Pour the mixture into a buttered pie pan and bake for 20 to 30 minutes until it is cooked through and set – although it’s technically a custard, you want it to set fully.

    Warm the jam in a small pan or in the microwave until it’s liquid. Spread the jam over the baked base – it should make a generous coating.

    Whisk the egg whites to stiff peaks and gently fold the sugar in to make the meringue. Pile over the jam, spreading to the edge of the pie dish.

    Bake the meringue for 10 minutes or so until it’s lightly golden brown and slightly crunchy. Let the pudding cool down until it’s room temperature.

    Serve at room temperature or cold. Be prepared for some slight cognitive dissonance – it looks like pie, but it eats like pudding!

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    Stuart’s Gluten Free Simnel pudding

    Posted on April 20, 2020 at 8:26 am

    Simnel Cake is a British Easter tradition. I decided to take the cake recipe and convert it to make a Simnel Pudding, because everyone needs some pudding in their life!

    Makes 1 large pudding. You can double the quantities to make 2.

  • 250g/8oz mixed dried fruit
  • 25g/1oz stem ginger (finely chopped or grated)
  • 1/2 lemon (zest and juice)
  • 1/2 orange (zest and juice)
  • 50g/1.75oz ground almonds
  • 50g/1.75oz buckwheat flour
  • 50g/1.75oz white rice flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp xanthan gum
  • 1/2 tbsp mixed spice such as pumpkin pie spice
  • 1/2 tsp ground ginger
  • 125g / 4oz / 1 stick soft butter
  • 125g / 4oz brown sugar
  • 2 large eggs, beaten
  • 1 portion marzipan
  • 2 tbsp dark rum or bourbon (optional)
  • 1-2 tbsp marmalade or apricot jam
  • Butter up your pudding basin.

    Put all the dry ingredients in a large bowl and mix or sift to combine. In a small bowl add all the fruit, ginger, zest and juices and stir to combine.

    Cream the butter and sugar. Blend in the flour and eggs in roughly 3 additions. Stir in the fruit and juices.

    Split the marzipan into 2 roughly equal portions. Pour half of the batter into the pudding basin. Form a rough disk with half of the marzipan and press gently onto the batter. Pour the rest of the batter on top of the marzipan disk. Steam for 2 hours.

    Pull the pudding out of your steamer. Pour the rum or bourbon on top, if using. Allow the pudding to cool for 20 to 30 minutes then turn out and brush with the marmalade or jam.

    Roll out the remaining marzipan to drape over the narrow top of the pudding. Use your hands to gently form the marzipan into a covering over the pudding.

    If you want to add a finishing touch, put the marzipan covered pudding under the broiler just until the top starts to brown, then serve.

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    Carrot pudding

    Posted on October 6, 2019 at 7:42 pm

    Here’s a recipe from Mrs Beeton from 1859 or so. It’s delicious.

  • 1/2 lb. of bread crumbs (gluten free alt: mix of oats and corn flakes)
  • 4 oz. of suet (or butter)
  • 3/4 lb. carrot
  • 1/4 lb. raisins
  • 1/4 lb. currants
  • 3 oz. sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • milk
  • 1 tsp ground nutmeg
  • Boil the carrots in milk until tender enough to mash to a pulp; add the remaining ingredients. If needed, add more milk to make the pudding of the consistency of thick batter.

    If you want to steam the pudding, put the mixture into a buttered basin, tie it down with a cloth, and steam for 2-1/2 hours: if to be baked, put it into a pie-dish, and bake for about an hour; turn it out of the dish, sift sugar over it, and serve with custard or heavy cream.

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    Gluten free pudding flour

    Posted on November 3, 2018 at 7:08 pm

    I recently discovered that I can’t eat wheat, which is a major downer when making pudding. After a lot of poking around and trying out various flour substitute recipes from various gluten free sources, I found this recipe:

    • 700 grams cornstarch
    • 500 grams tapioca starch
    • 300 grams white rice flour
    • 200 grams brown rice flour
    • 200 grams nonfat milk power
    • 100 grams potato flour
    • 20 grams xanthan gum

    This does, indeed, make a wonderful substitute for wheat flour. However… however, there’s a lot of weird ingredients there. They are also quite costly. I wasn’t going to let weird and expensive get in the way of making pudding, now was I?

    So let’s break this list down.

     

    • 700 grams cornstarch

    OK, this is a dirt cheap and common ingredient.

     

    • 500 grams tapioca starch

    OK, not cheap in your local grocery store.

     

    • 300 grams white rice flour

    Not readily available, and certainly not cheap.

     

    • 200 grams brown rice flour

    .. what the what now?

     

    • 200 grams nonfat milk power

    OK, back on normal ground.

     

    • 100 grams potato flour

    … you’re kidding, right?

     

    • 20 grams xanthan gum

    You’re definitely kidding now, that doesn’t even exist, does it? … it costs HOW MUCH?!!?

     

    OK, time to take a deep breath and break down the weird and expensive stuff. The ingredients break down into 3 categories: whole grain flour, starches, and support ingredients.

    WHOLE GRAIN FLOUR (sort of)
    Brown rice flour, Buckwheat flour, Corn (Maize) flour, Mesquite flour, Millet flour, Oat flour, Quinoa flour, Sorghum flour, and Teff flour all work as “whole grain flour” for the purposes of this recipe.

    STARCHES
    Arrowroot flour, Cornstarch, Potato flour, Potato starch, Sweet (also called glutinous) rice flour, Tapioca flour, White rice flour, are all starches for this purpose.

    Wait, what about potato flour? If you have instant potato flakes and a food processor or spice grinder, you have potato flour!

    SUPPORT INGREDIENTS
    Dried milk powder is available in pretty much every store. Shop by price. Xanthan gum is more difficult, and expensive. It is there to be a thickener/binding agent to replace gluten. There are some other options for the thickener such as psyllium husk powder. These kind of ingredients can be found in health food type stores such as Whole Foods or Sprouts in the USA, or online at Amazon.com. Unfortunately there is no real substitute for these ingredients, and they are expensive. Thankfully you only tend to use a very small amount in each recipe. Shop by price.

     

    So, let’s break down the flour recipe.
    700 grams cornstarch + 500 grams tapioca starch + 300 grams white rice flour

    That’s 1.5kg of starches from different sources. Check out the starches list above to see which you can get for a decent price near you.

     

    200 grams brown rice flour – use whichever of the “whole grain” flours above you can source at a good price.

     

    200 grams nonfat milk power – shop by price.

     

    100 grams potato flour – no need to substitute this. You’ve got the potato flakes and food processor, right?

     

    20 grams xanthan gum – yeah, OK, that’s expensive. Bite the bullet and put it in, it’s only a couple of tablespoons worth.

     

    By percentages: 75% starches, 10% whole grain flour, 10% milk powder, 5% potato flour. Add your xanthan gum, mix thoroughly, and label clearly.

    So why should you, person who doesn’t have a problem with wheat and/or gluten, make up an exotic concoction like this? Because this mix makes the most ridiculously light and fluffy puddings, muffins that evaporate in your mouth, and allows your friends or family who do have wheat/gluten issues to enjoy some delicious pudding!

     

    PIE CRUST

    When using this blend to make a pie crust, the good news is you don’t have to worry about over-working and making a tough crust: no gluten! You do, however, need to work it a bit more thoroughly than wheat flour to make sure all the fat is fully incorporated into the flour. I have also found this blend to be a little more “thirsty” than wheat, so be prepared to add a little more liquid to make your pie crust.

    Mind you, if you’re making your pie crust with butter (as you should!) you’ll probably be OK on the extra liquid!

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    Spotted dick pudding

    Posted on November 2, 2018 at 2:50 pm

    Also known as spotted duff or spotted dog, the words “dick, duff, dog” all derive from the word “dough”. Any other suggestion comes from a smutty mind 😉

    Spotted dick is your basic steamed pudding. These ingredients will show up frequently here…

    SPOTTED DICK PUDDING

  • 8oz / 240g self raising flour
  • 4oz / 120g unsalted butter OR suet
  • 3oz / 80g caster / powdered sugar
  • *pinch of salt if using unsalted self raising flour
  • Beat together the butter and sugar until just combined (note: not the creaming method, just incorporation). Beat in the flour.

    Add

  • 8oz / 240g dried fruit (raisins, currants, sultanas, goldens, craisins, cherries….), soaked in brown liquor, then drained
  • to the batter.

    add up to

  • 160ml / 5.5oz cold milk
  • to the batter, just enough to bring it together in a somewhat firm dough.

    Place dough in a well buttered pudding basin and steam for 2 hours OR microwave for around 5-10 minutes, depending on the strength of your microwave. Microwaving time will really depend on your own experience with your micro – for me, about 5 minutes nuke then rest for a couple of minutes.

    Your duff/dick/dog is ready when it is just set. Serve with lashings of freshly made custard and a nice cuppa tea.

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